10 unknown facts about great works of art

10 unknown facts about great works of art

The Statue of Liberty, the Tower of Pisa, the Eiffel Tower, Munch's Creek and the Egyptian Sphinx are all famous works of art. However, they are associated with some truly intriguing facts that have eluded our pop culture. Is there something among them that disappeared years ago, or was it simply hidden from view all the time, but we most likely never knew these facts about great works of art.

10. Secret Room in the Eiffel Tower1
In the Eiffel Tower there is a secret apartment located at its highest level. The apartment is owned by Gustave Eiffel - the engineer who designed the tower. In 1890, a year after the Eiffel Tower was opened, French writer Henri Girard declared that Gustave Eiffel was “the object of universal envy” among the citizens of Paris. This envy, according to Girard, was provoked not by the glory that Gustave acquired as the creator of the tower, or the state in which the tower was evaluated, and because of the apartment he owned at the top of the tower.In this apartment, where only Eiffel had access, many important guests were received; Thomas Edison was prominent among them. They say that Eifel received several offers, where they wanted to give him a substantial amount of money, for the right to spend one night in this apartment. The apartment, which has remained closed for several years, has recently been open to the public. Today it contains the figures of Eiffel and Edison. As if alive, these wax figures depict a scene where Eiffel and his daughter Claire greet Edison. Also on the Eiffel Tower, the names of 72 scientists and engineers who designed it are engraved.

9. What was the inspiration for the picture "Scream"2
Edward Munch's Scream is one of the most iconic paintings of the 20th century, so iconic that it was attempted to be stolen more than once. According to Munch, he was inspired to write the picture “Scream” by the day when he was walking with his friends and saw that “the sky turned red like blood”, a feeling of incredible tiredness arose before him, and he heard “a terrible endless cry of nature”. For many years, it was thought that Munch inspired his imagination, until recently they discovered that the sky on that day probably was actually red as a result of the eruption of the volcano Krakatau in Indonesia in 1883.The impact of the volcano was felt even as far away as in New York, where the sky was reportedly “reddened”. The same impact was felt in the city of Munch, where two days later the city newspapers declared that "people thought it was fire: but it was in fact a refraction of red rays in a foggy atmosphere after sunset." And although the terrible scream on Munk's canvas arose in his imagination, the sky probably was really like that.

8. Leaning Tower of Pisa, designed by an unknown architect3
Also known as the Torre Pendente di Pisa, the Leaning Tower of Pisa is known not only as a landmark, but also for its secrets. Although the reason for its rather substantial slope is well known (it has an unstable foundation), no one knows who designed it. This tower was originally supposed to be a separate bell tower (or campanile) for the cathedral of the city of Pisa. Such towers were common in the 10th century in Italy, as they were thought to symbolize how powerful and rich the city is. The Tower of Pisa, however, was built to attract people to the cathedral in Pisa. The main reason why no one knows who designed the tower is that it took almost 200 years to complete the tower.Historians generally believe that the tower was designed by Bonanno Pisano, but this is disputed. An architect named Diotsalvi is considered the more likely person to design the tower because he designed the city’s baptistery and the bell tower of San Nicola.

7. The chain at the feet of the Statue of Liberty4
In 2011, when asked what the Statue of Liberty symbolizes, the former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin replied: "This is, of course, a symbol that reminds Americans of other countries because it was presented to us by the French: other countries warn us never to make mistakes, which some of them have committed. " Unfortunately, Sarah Palin was completely wrong, as she said the exact opposite of what Lady Liberty is. And just like Palin, many people do not know about the connection between the statue and slavery. Edouard de Laboulet, a famous French politician and opponent of slavery, was the man who influenced the creation of the Statue of Liberty. He was a strong supporter of President Lincoln, who fought for the abolition of slavery. The statue was not a gift warning the United States, as Palin said.It was presented to celebrate the triumph of freedom, democracy, and the end of all forms of slavery. That is why there is a broken chain at the feet of Lady Liberty. The chain is usually invisible to tourists, because she is under her robe, at her left leg and can only be viewed from above.

6. Lost beard of the Sphinx5
We have already said that we barely found the Sphinx and do not know the secret of his missing nose. And, few people know the story of his beard. The sphinx was not originally built with a beard. And in fact, it was joined soon after it was created. It was added, perhaps to link the Sphinx with Horemakhet, one of the Egyptian gods. It may also have been meant to make the Sphinx look like Egyptian pharaohs, who often wore artificial beards as a symbol of power, and to look like the god Osiris. One thirtieth of the beard is currently in the British Museum. It was donated to the museum by Italian Egyptologist Giovanni Cavilla, who dug up parts of the Sphinx in 1817, when it was almost completely covered with sand. Several other parts of the Sphinx beard were found between 1925 and 1926, when sand was excavated near the Sphinx again.

5. Hidden da Vinci music6
In 2007, Giovanni Maria Pala, an Italian computer specialist and musician, declared that he had found musical notes in Leonardo da Vinci’s famous Last Supper. According to Pala, if you draw five lines of the stave on the canvas; then the hands of Jesus Christ, the hands of his apostles, and loaves of bread on the table will represent musical notes that will make sense if you read them from right to left. Da Vinci was known as a musical enthusiast who included musical riddles in his works, which were to be read from right to left. Alessandro Vezzosi, director of the Da Vinci Specialized Museum in Tuscany, believes that Pal’s assumption looks "plausible." Vezzozi also said that Da Vinci played the lyre and made sketches of several new musical instruments. "There is always the risk of seeing what is not, but it’s absolutely certain that the space (on the canvas) is harmoniously divided," he said. "Where there are harmonic proportions, you can find music."

4. Difficulties in choosing the color of the Golden Gate Bridge7
The Golden Gate Bridge holds the record as the most frequently photographed bridge in the world.Interestingly, the US Navy did not want the bridge to be built, because they were afraid that if the bridge was blown up and destroyed, it would become a trap for their ships on the quay in San Francisco Bay. The Navy later agreed to build a bridge. However, they did not like the color in which the bridge was to be painted. They, along with the army, wanted the bridge to be painted with a black and yellow strip so that it was visible in the fog. However, the bridge architect, Irving Morrow, had a different plan. When the steel that was to be used for the bridge arrived in San Francisco, it was already painted with a base layer so that the steel was ready for further painting. Then most of the bridges were painted in gray, brown and black, but Morrow had to paint it in an “international orange” color, similar to the color of the base layer. International orange is not only visible in the fog, but also complements and contrasts with the blue sky and the bay.

3. Scandal with a portrait of Madame X8
The portrait of Madame X is a famous painting of a young American immigrant and celebrity named John Singer Sargent depicting Virginie Aveno Gotro.Sargent hoped that Madame X would make him a good reputation. The portrait made him famous, or notorious, because of his supposed obscenity. After he was shown at the Salon exhibition, the portrait was strongly criticized and ridiculed. The main reason for criticism was the right strap in the portrait. The strap on the original portrait fell off the right shoulder, revealing a bit more of the skin of the model. The scandal that followed was so strong that Sargent was forced to move to the UK. The Gotro family was ashamed of the scandal, and they begged Sargent to remove the picture. Sargent, in an attempt to reassure critics and the public, repainted the shoulder strap into what we see in the portrait today.

2. Mount Rushmore Time Capsule9
Although it is well known that the work on Mount Rushmore is not completed, few people know about its time capsule. When creating a bas-relief on Rushmore, his chief architect Gutzon Borglum wanted to create a large hall that would serve as the main room, where all important documents in American history would be preserved. He thought that the addition of such important documents and charters as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution would make the already outstanding monument even more significant.Unfortunately, he had difficulties due to the lack of money and the necessary space, and he died in 1941, leaving the work unfinished. In 1998, according to the Constitution, 16 enameled tiles containing text from the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights, as well as Borglum's memoirs, and stories about the presidents carved on the mountain, were placed in a titanium store and sealed inside the unfinished hall. These documents must remain sealed and intact for thousands of years.

1. “The Last Judgment” by Michelangelo10
Shortly before his death, Pope Clement VII ordered Michelangelo to paint the Last Judgment on the walls of the Sistine Chapel. The images were supposed to show that last day, also called the Day of Judgment, when Jesus Christ would return to the world. The piece, however, caused some controversy after Michelangelo portrayed several characters naked, showing their genitals, including Jesus Christ and his mother Mary. This was not understood by the cardinal, who began the “campaign of fig leaves” with the goal of removing or making them severely censored. The Master of Ceremonies Pope, Biagio da Cesena, also joined this,calling for censorship, or to completely remove the drawings, which, according to him, are more suitable for display in a public bath or in a bar rather than a church. This angered Michelangelo, who then used the face of Cesena to paint the face of Minos, the god of the afterlife. He also added the donkey’s ears to him to indicate Cesena’s “stupidity”. Images of naked remained in the church until 1564, until the Council of Trent decided that they should be covered with “braghes” (literally “pants”), for example, fig leaves or draped cloth. During restoration work in 1993, about half of the braghes covering the genitalia of the characters were removed, and it became clear that Michelangelo actually painted Minos with a snake wrapped around his waist and biting him in the groin.

Related news

  • How to sit in California
  • Miracle of thread - izona
  • Portuguese-Indian War of 1961
  • Novoalekseevka: a selection of sites
  • DIY jewelry, making Dragonfly pendant using Swarowski crystals
  • 10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art

    10 unknown facts about great works of art