British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

A group of scientists from the University of Warwick and Birmingham tried to find out why only a few dozen out of a million spermatozoa entering the female reproductive tract during ejaculation can reach the egg. As a result of the experiments, it was found that everything depends on the method of navigation - the majority of sperm cells do not move in the center, but “from wall to wall” and carry them on turns. The work was published in the online version of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

It is known that in order to get to the egg, sperm must pass through narrow, winding, filled with a viscous secretion channels. During the experiments, researchers used a syringe to “launch” male germ cells into a specially created labyrinth of micro-channels and observe their behavior.

It turned out that spermatozoa, instead of moving in the fastest way, along the central section of the channel, most often do it in a “wall-to-wall” manner.That is, they move as a whole “crowd” along the canal walls, and reaching a place of bending, when the direction of movement changes abruptly, at different angles cut into the opposite wall and, often, into each other, in order to “fly off” in the opposite direction. All this reminded the authors of the work of participants in racing.

"I could not help but smile as I watched spermatozoa regularly roll on turns, after which a head-on collision with the opposite wall occurred," one of the authors of the study, Dr. Peter Denissenko of the University of Warwick, quotes The Daily Mail.

This method of movement disrupts most of the male germ cells on the road. Only those who were able to overcome the labyrinth without a loss, or still moving along the middle channel of the channel, or successfully "taxiing" on turns, reach the place.

According to another author, Dr. Jackson Kirman-Brown from the University of Birmingham, previous studies of their group showed that the shape of the head also determines the success of each individual sperm cell. The combination of this information and the results of the last study will allow, Kirman-Brown believestake a fresh look at the methods of selection of male germ cells in artificial insemination.

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  • British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing

    British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing British scientists compared spermatozoa with participants of auto racing